Modified Yamaha RX-Z Motocross Style

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Ady Sevens shared the link about this Yamaha RX-Z modified to motocross style as seen on Mudah.my. This kind of mod is very unusual since most RX-Z are modded lightly just to make it street legal but powerful and fast. This one in motocross style are equipped with monoshock rear suspension and the exposed front suspension that it makes it looks very different. We can only see the RX-Z design cues from the unmistaken look of the fuel tank. Good mod bro!

Thanks to Ady Sevens for sharing.

Via: http://m.mudah.my/view?ca=0_1_s&ad_id=19834722

1980s Yamaha SR-Z 150 – the 4-stroke RX-Z

I love this SRZ 150. It have the same styling like the legendary Yamaha RX-Z 135 which has been a rider ‘super’bike for a very long time. This on, SRZ150, features an engine with 4-stroke 150cc displacement and single cylinder. It still looks good event though it is just a 4-stroker.

It can be a great addition to many of current RX-Z rider, the problem is whether we can find this in Malaysia?  Continue reading “1980s Yamaha SR-Z 150 – the 4-stroke RX-Z”

Yamaha RX-Z: End of Production, Beginning of A Legend

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Yamaha RX-Z is one of the most popular bike in Malaysia. It represent the perfect bike for anyone who like to have power, speed, style and freedom in the world of biking. Yamaha RX-Z have all the formula for an exciting biking experience and the same time maintains the price to be affordable for almost everyone. At RM8500, it is considered accessible to all rider with the availability of loan by the bike shop or by Aeon Credit Service. Even though it is accessible, the rider must at least have a job, I say this because many rider like to own this bike, but they are still studying and of course, have no money to plonk for Yamaha RX-Z yet. So, they are thinking to buy this bike when they finish their study and have a job. I know this because I’m one of them. Now, the production of Yamaha RX-Z has already stopped, it leave us with only the secondhand Yamaha RX-Z to grab. Slowly, I can see Yamaha RX-Z price increased whether for new one that might still available in very limited unit and also for the secondhand one that are available at shops and Mudah.my. Continue reading “Yamaha RX-Z: End of Production, Beginning of A Legend”

Yamaha RX-Z 6-speed Green Black Sticker

This is the same decals sticker that I have installed to my 1997 6-speed RX-Z. Looks normal. Not so mean and not so soft. Just perfect.

I don’t know this sticker is originally for RX-Z in what year. So, I hope you can help by giving comment if you know.

2 more pictures after the jump Continue reading “Yamaha RX-Z 6-speed Green Black Sticker”

1997 RX-Z Restored!

1997 6-Speed RX-Z Restoration Project

Do you still remember the picture above? It is about a Yamaha RX-Z bike that I bought for RM500+ that I’m going to restore sometime in May 2008.
Now, the restoration has finished. Enjoy the picture below and look for the original look for the bike before any restoration has been done.
Newly painted engine cover but the kick starter has not been replaced yet since there is no stock for the original one
Carburetor is new since the old one is very dirty and hard to clean
 
New rims, tyre, hub, rear footrest but old exhaust painted to black
Definitely restored to full glory 

Nicely done in black with green stripe

There is nothing more satisfying other than looking at the bike that once is hedious and teribble but now looking like new and full of spirit.
Remember to read the previous look of this bike here!

Best Sprocket Size for Yamaha RX-Z: 16T-39T?

Yamaha RX-Z 135 16T Front Sprocket

Yamaha RX-Z 135 39T Rear Sprocket

Yamaha RX-Z 135 428 Chain

Standard Yamaha RX-Z from factory is fitted with 16T and 46T (if you are wondering what is the “T” behind the number, it is actually TEETH).
Currently, I’m using 16T-42T on my Yamaha RX-Z since I use it as my daily commuter to work. For now it is okay but, after I change my original exhaust to Yoshi Racing exhaust, I think I need to do something about it. This is because the new exhaust has released more power and torque than the original standard exhaust.
My next sprocket change is to 16T-39T as pictured above. I haven’t installed this yet as I’m a little bit busy for now. This changes I think will not effect much on the performance since I only use it on short trip. Using smaller rear sprocket can give benefit for long distance traveling since it can give lower RPM at the same speed using standard sprocket. It can also give better fuel efficiency since it revs low.
You should also check for the material that is used to make the sprocket. As you can see in the picture, the rear sprocket is being made with High Carbon Steel(HCS). HCS is a lighter material than steel. Also HCS is better in terms of durability since it can withstand pressure and the friction from the drive chain. The best material for sprocket is made from the mixture of metals also known as alloy. Alloy is much tougher, lighter and eventually more expensive. The hardest material that is known to man is diamond, but I have never seen sprocket being made from diamond before.
Here is another information about sprocket material for industry application at http://www.daviesmarketing.com

“Sprocket Materials

Most standard sprockets are manufactured from steel. They can be made from many type of material, but the offerings from most manufacturers are based upon their own equipment limitations and the tooling available to cut the teeth.

Below is a listing of typical sprocket materials and their most frequent application environments.

Steel – Is considered the most typical construction material. It is available in different hardness levels (covered later) and is used in all types of applications.

Bronze – Is a metal used in non-magnetic applications where ‘no sparking’ is required. It can also withstand the abuse of some corrosive environments.

Brass – Is also a non-magnetic application material with the ability to stand up in a number of corrosive environments.

Stainless Steel – This is the most common material used for corrosive environments. It is widely applied throughout in the food processing industry and most manufacturers have types approved for direct food contact.

Titanium – Light weight and very strong, this metal is a silvery, dark grey colour and is designed for highly corrosive applications or direct chemical exposure such as in the electrical industry where printed circuit boards are cleaned.

Aluminium – Silvery, light weight metal that can resist corrosion but is restricted to light duty, light load applications. Typically used in belt and pulley applications (timing belts).

Nylon (Plastic) – As with roller chain, nylon is also used for anti-corrosive environments, as well as for quietness.

Nylon materials are also generally less expensive than metal. Nylon sprockets can be used in the food industry, as they hold up well in wash down situations. These plastic sprockets can be constructed from electro-conductive through heat resistant styles – similarly found in plastic chain.”
What is the sprocket that you are using now? Let’s share the knowledge!